Real estate engagement for your website: the complete guide

Real estate engagement

When it comes to real estate engagement, one thing must be said: Tajarat Properties marketing has profoundly changed in recent years, becoming more and more interested in the online world and social networks. Whether it’s buying or renting a home, today it all starts with the magical world of the World Wide Web.

2018 is the era of Big Data and this means that everything becomes traceable. The Internet thus proves to be a very powerful marketing tool and a fundamental channel for communication between agents and customers.

A real estate agency should have a solid online presence for many reasons: for example, making itself known to new potential customers looking for a home, attracting sellers who want to sell their property, maintaining relationships with old and potential customers. , guide customers in the purchase phase and advise them in the best possible way.

Furthermore, measuring your visitors’ online activity allows you to understand how your website is used and how users respond to your content.

Google Analytics can track almost everything about your website: who comes to the page, how long they stay, which pages they prefer, and so much more. But the tools it puts at your disposal can give you a series of metrics that won’t be of much help if you don’t know how to grasp their meaning and usefulness.

In fact, many agents do not consider real estate engagement metrics at all. Don’t think you’re too busy or don’t know where to start. Tracking metrics is not something abstruse and complicated and will prove to be a tactic that pays off in the medium to long term.

And since everything is quantifiable, what should we observe? User engagement metrics have become a fundamental part of understanding if your website or social pages are having success, but which ones are really important?

In this article, team of Taj residencia cover some of Google Analytics’ real estate engagement metrics to measure the impact of your website and its content on visitors. Real estate engagement indicators

What is user engagement?

The definition may vary depending on whether it is a product or website. In the broadest terms possible, it all revolves around the users interacting with your site. Real estate user engagement can be measured through many factors: how often visitors open your website, how long they stay, what they do when they use it, and whether they recommend it to their friends and family.

The user engagement metrics of your real estate website are divided according to macro areas of the Google Analytics dashboard, including:

  • Audience
    this area outlines who visits your website and their demographics, along with the number of views your content has received.
  • Acquisition
    The Acquisitionssection shows how users come to your website, through advertisements, organic or direct searches, or referral links from other websites.
  • Behavior
    the Behaviorarea indicates trends in what users are doing as they visit your website. <<<
  • Conversions
    The Conversionssections track whether users complete the goals you have set for your site.

Each of these areas contains many indicators of real estate engagement but, in this article, Park view city will see only the most important ones.

Social sharing

Put simply, social sharing analyzes how visitors promote your content on social media: Twitter, Facebook, LinkedIn, etc. The more they share them, the greater the resonance of your posts or content.

Low levels of social sharing can mean different things depending on the other data you are collecting. If your traffic, time on page, and bounce rate are all unsatisfactory, a low level of sharing tells you what you already know: you need to make your content more interesting, informative, and useful.

If, on the other hand, these metrics are relatively good, there may be another problem: people aren’t sharing your posts because they don’t think most of their network will like it. The solution? Broaden your horizons. Just because you’re in the business of condo rentals doesn’t mean all of your posts need to be explicitly addressed to renters and condominium owners. Use industry-specific terms and keywords where necessary, but don’t overdo it.

Another possible problem? You are not making your website easy enough to navigate. Make sure you include social sharing buttons in every post or, if you have already, consider moving them to a better section of the page.

Comments to posts

Indicates the relationship between the number of blog posts you publish and the number of visitor responses in the comments sections, essential variables for real estate engagement. If you haven’t yet enabled comments on your posts, you’re missing out on an important opportunity to get direct feedback on your content. Having a review on what you write helps you create better posts and build a stronger community of readers.

Do you have a lot of comments related to the posts? Great! This shows that your ideas are making a good impact and that people want to provide feedback. Do you have very few comments? You may need to encourage your readers by placing a strong call to action at the end of your posts, asking for comments or answers to specific questions.

When analyzing the post / comment relationship, it is crucial to look at the content of the comments themselves. If most of your comments are spam or empty praise (“Great post!”), they don’t add much value in terms of engagement. Negative comments or criticisms, while grabbing visitors’ attention, could end up having negative repercussions in the long run, depending on how you are responding. The best comments add value by offering new information on the topic or offer the opportunity to add value if you reply intelligently.

Visits for shares

This generic term refers to the frequency with which your visitors perform a certain action on your website. An “action” can consist of: registering for an account, logging in, completing/updating a user profile, downloading a guide, subscribing to a mailing list, etc. The question you have to ask yourself is always the same: how often and to what extent does my content push, people, to do what I want?

If your visitors aren’t logging in or signing up as you hope, you should ask yourself three questions:

1. Am I making it clear what actions I want them to perform?

Your readers won’t know they need to download your ten-page homebuyer guide unless you put it on your home page, blog posts, and social media.

2. Am I making it easier for them to actually perform the action?

If users can’t subscribe to your blog’s RSS feed with one click or create an account in less than thirty seconds, they probably won’t.

3. Are these actions valuable to users in the first place?

Creating a login system for your visitors will allow you to track their habits, but if it doesn’t give them new tools, what good is all of this?

Number of active sessions and new sessions

Google defines a session as “the period in which a user is actively engaged on your website, app, etc.” A session begins the moment a user arrives at your website and includes all the actions they take during the session. The duration of each corresponds to the actual browsing time plus 30 minutes of user inactivity. Therefore, if a visitor opens your website, stays inactive for 30 minutes and then ends up returning later, for Google you will have two distinct sessions.

When referring to new sessions, however, we refer to the visits made by users for the first time. If this percentage is high, it means that a lot of new traffic is coming to your website. If this percentage is low, most of your users are returning visitors who have visited your website previously. While the new traffic indicates that your web marketing activities are bringing in new users, you also need to maintain a high number of returning visitors as these represent more engaged visitors and are easier to convert into customers.

To improve these metrics you should create engaging content and deliver a great user experience, the content should be engaging. Furthermore, the website should be easy to navigate and have a modern design. You’ll also need to post new content consistently if you want someone to visit your website, be it a new or returning user. So, share them via social media and email regularly, always including social sharing buttons.

Users

That is, the actual visitors to your website.

Converting 10 users to 10 leads is very difficult, so the more users you have on your website, the better your chances of converting. Conversely, if you have a lot of traffic but few conversions, you are not pouring the right strategies to convert them to your website.

Generating and increasing user traffic to your real estate website requires a combination of powerful content, search engine optimization and real estate web advertising.

Pages

Measure the total number of times your website pages are viewed. Even if a page is viewed more than once in a session, all views of the page in the same session are counted equally.

Instead, if we refer to Unique Pageviews , unlike the previous case, we only consider one pageview per user session, even if users return to the page repeatedly.

Refer to the pages where you want to get more engagement . Optimize them based on a keyword that makes you better position, in-depth content and eye-catching graphics and consider resetting the page to different keywords if you see that the page is not attracting the right traffic.

Average page depth (pages / session)

This report shows the average number of pages viewed during a session. A great way to gauge whether your audience is only stopping on one page or multiple pages of your website.

While an increase in the time users spend on the website improves conversion opportunities, it is difficult to determine a “good” page / session range. If users spend an average of 10 minutes on your website and look at five pages, this could show a real interest in your content. If, however, they have looked at 10 pages and come out (in jargon, “bounce”) after a minute, it is likely that users have not found what they were looking for. Focus on session length, specific pages visited and bounce rates to get an idea of ​​what your users like or don’t like.

If you want users to visit more pages of your real estate website, include engagement prompts, such as calls to action (CTAs), which will attract users to increase their chances of clicking on other valuable content or landing pages.

Average session duration

Calculate the average length of sessions in the different data ranges.

Increasing time on the site signals users that your content is interesting and increases conversion opportunities. In general, a low session length indicates that a significant portion of users are leaving your website quickly. But remember that this is just a calculated average of those who stay the longest, those who leave immediately after arriving, and the sessions that cannot be measured by Google.

To improve real estate engagement on your website it is necessary to facilitate the navigation of the pages with more usable menus. Also include specific elements for mobile browsing, offer engaging content targeted to your target users and include property listings on the website to entice users to click on it.

Number of pages per session

Do your users simply open the website and close it immediately? Are several pages scrolling? That’s all this metric takes into account.

Knowing what users are doing on your website, the pages they are opening and how they are using them can be vital in detecting user experience or graphical interface problems.

Pages with longer and shorter visit duration

This metric is an extension of the number of “pages per session”. Analyze each page in more detail, providing valuable information to increase the efficiency of your website.

If some features of your real estate brand’s website aren’t doing well, you can focus on this data to understand what your users find most useful.

Pages with most user interactions

It shows which pages people click on the most.

If you are unsure of what works or does not work on a particular page, use the Google Analytics in-page analysis feature, which allows you to explore your website within the platform to see which areas receive the most. Of clicks.

Doing this is helpful in understanding how users navigate through your website and can be crucial in identifying problem areas. Also, if you want a clearer overview of the pages, use the heat map and user experience tools to measure on-page activity.

Average time on page

Shows the average time users spend on a specific page or screen.

To improve this, you should provide better content. An enticing headline can generate a click, but if the content is difficult to view, is not relevant to the user’s needs, or just plain boring, it can reduce the average time on that page. Your content should answer the question or problem it promises to solve, be clear and attractive to your target audience, and should be comprehensive enough to compete with other articles on the same topic.

Bounce rate

Bounce Rate measures visits to each page and when users enter and leave your website.

Bounce rates between 26 and 40 percent are excellent, 56 to 70 percent are above average, and 70 percent corresponds to a medium-high bounce rate. Bounce rate may vary by page type (for example, news articles may have a higher bounce rate than ads).

Exit rate

Exit Rate measures how often users leave your website from a given page.

Since each session ends in an exit, it is inevitable that a percentage of exit is associated with each page. What should you worry about? If you have important content or a landing page where you want to collect information about users, but you have a high exit rate on these pages, then you will need to modify them to increase their navigability.

To clarify, the exit rate indicates the percentage of page views in which the page considered was the last in the session, while the bounce rate indicates the percentage of visits in which the page in question was the only one. Of the session.

Conclusions

Knowing the real estate engagement indicators in depth will allow you to better juggle in applying the best user engagement strategies within your real estate agency’s website.

The more you refine your techniques thanks to the tools provided by applications such as Google Analytics, the more your website audience will be motivated to stay on your site, to visit the properties offered in your real estate portfolio, to finally click on one of the calls -to-action that will lead you to the acquisition of new customers.

You just have to apply what you learned today from this guide, the results aimed at your goal of maximizing real estate engagement will be tangible right away!

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